New store is going to the dogs

Sophie Phillips shows off the products on display at her pet store, Sprocket and Stone, 1013 E. 53rd St. Marc Monaghan
Sophie Phillips shows off the products on display at her pet store, Sprocket and Stone, 1013 E. 53rd St.

-Marc Monaghan

BY ALLISON MATYUS
Staff Writer

In its third week of business, Hyde Park’s newest pet store, Sprocket and Stone, 1013 E. 53rd St., has gone to the dogs … in a good way.

“Dogs walking by actually pull their owners towards the door,” said owner Sophie Phillips. “I think they must smell our bone selection near the front of the store.”

Phillips describes Sprocket and Stone, named after her two rescue dogs, as a “boutique” pet store, with more unique and quality-focused items than pet owners would find at the bigger chains. Gourmet options for dogs and cats are carried at the store, but are still at an affordable price.

“I’m bringing things in for quality instead of quantity. Customers can feel comfortable that whatever product they will find in the store is something that not only I would feed my pets, but that I completely support and believe in,” she said.

A Hyde Park resident for more than a decade, Phillips said it only made sense to set up shop in the area that she was familiar with in a community that was familiar with her.

“I think [Hyde Park] is getting to a fantastic direction as far as businesses go and what people can find in their neighborhood,” she said.
And with the opening of Sprocket and Stone, pet owners can find unique treats for their furry friends.

“We offer a wide variety of dog bones,” Phillips said, gesturing towards a table full of bones. Dogs can choose from various types of bones like beef tracheas, shinbones and even duck feet.

“Duck feet seems to be everyone’s favorite, even dogs who are not interested in bones,” Phillips said.

Sprocket and Stone also carries raw dog food, which Phillips explained is what dog’s natural, wild instincts crave.

“What a dog would look for in the wild would be fresh prey, so the raw food mimics that prey philosophy,” she said.

She said her customers are always willing to transition into something else and learn about a new product, which is why she provides samples and a 100 percent exchangeable refund on all products.

The store also carries gift options such as mugs, candles, collars and original artwork done by Phillips herself.

In the future, Phillips said she will start to offer training classes for animals, as well as nail clippings once or twice a month.

“I have a friend who is a chef and we loosely talked about creating a cookie line or something of that sort,” she said. “I want to make Sprocket and Stone a brand name.”

a.matyus@hpherald.com