U. of. C. History Dept. features Trump lecture series

University of Chicago professor Paul Cheney shared his perspective on the election of Donald Trump during a forum of History Department faculty “Understanding the Trump Phenomenon,” in the 5727 Building, 5727 S. University Ave., Friday, Dec. 2. Members of the forum’s panel included (left to right) professors Faith Hillis, Fredrik Albritton Jonsson, Kathleen Belew, Cheney and Adam Green. -Marc Monaghan

University of Chicago professor Paul Cheney shared his perspective on the election of Donald Trump during a forum of History Department faculty “Understanding the Trump Phenomenon,” in the 5727 Building, 5727 S. University Ave., Friday, Dec. 2. Members of the forum’s panel included (left to right) professors Faith Hillis, Fredrik Albritton Jonsson, Kathleen Belew, Cheney and Adam Green.

Marc Monaghan

By TONIA HILL
Staff Writer

The History department at the University of Chicago (U. of C.) hosted part one of a lecture series entitled: “Understanding the Trump Phenomenon.” Part one of the series was hosted, Fri. Dec. 2, at the Math-Stats Building, 5727 S. University Ave.

Five professors from the history department gave 10-minute presentations from varying perspectives to understand the 2016 election cycle and the rise of Donald Trump and what lies ahead for the country.

Fredrik Albritton Jonsson, an associate professor of British history, focused on how world leaders should address global climate change. Many lawmakers on the right do not see global warming as an issue. In November of 2012, Donald Trump posted a tweet on Twitter about his views on global warming, “the concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive.”

Jonsoon said that climate change is vital and that sea levels are rising and ice in the Artic is thinning. He added that it is important that all governments acknowledge the issue of climate change.

Kathleen Belew, assistant professor of U.S. History, focused on white nationalist groups and the impact that these groups have had historically in the country.

Faith Hillis, assistant professor of Russian History, drew connections to Russian politics and its influence on the election cycle. Hillis noted that there was a rise in illiberalism, a governing system in which citizens are cut off from knowledge about the activities in power because they lack civil liberties, and how that ideology is practiced in Russia.

Also featured in the lecture was a question and answer segment where members of the audience gave voice to their ideas about the rise of Trump.

The second of the lecture series will be offered in January, and details for the event are still being decided.

Another faculty member at the university in the anthropology department, William Mazzarella is considering adding a Trump 101 course for the spring quarter 2017, the form and content will be clear by next year, wrote Mazzarella via email. He reached out to students via email to see if there was interest for the course.

t.hill@hpherald.com