MSI celebrates high school seniors enrolled in museum program

High School seniors in the Museum of Science and Industry’s (MSI), Science Achievers youth development program stand outside of the museum, 5700 S. Lake Shore Drive, on Saturday, June 17. During an end of term celebration, the seniors were awarded laptop computers. 
– Photo courtesy of the Museum of Science and Industry. 

By TONIA HILL
Staff Writer

The Museum of Science and Industry honored 27 high school seniors, Saturday, June 17, from the Chicago area for their passion for science and their participation in the Museum’s Science Achievers youth development program.

Of the 27 who were honored two students Taylor Calloway and Cornelius Brown were graduates of Kenwood Academy High School, 5015 S. Blackstone Ave.

“The amazing friends I have here, and the youth development portion helped me grow into a young adult that seeks opportunities and creates a landscape that I can thrive in and connect to others in amazing ways,” Calloway said in a written statement.

MSI’s Science Achievers program is designed to give teens the chance to learn about science, develop leadership and public speaking skills, prepare for college, and learn about science careers.

Additionally, teens enrolled in the program earned service learning hours while engaging museum visitors in hands-on science experiments at MSI and at community events that are held at libraries and other locations.

For example, programs include TESLA, Fab Lab, and Floor Programming. TESLA is a live science television show that features the Science Achievers that airs on CAN-TV, a Chicago community access television station. On the show, viewers learn about different gadgets and technology, and they also can conduct at home science experiments.

The Fab Lab teaches digital design and fabrication to the Science Achievers, which help them develop design skills. Youth enrollees use state-of-the-art technology such as a 3D printer, laser cutter, and vinyl cutter and more.

Floor programming is an opportunity for teens to demonstrate hands-on science projects to visitors at MSI. For example, guests can create their own DIY Night Light using an empty paper box, a light bulb, batteries, electrical wire, and tape.

Graduating seniors in the program volunteered nearly 7,255 hours to engage the public in science activities. The group also was accepted to 19 universities and counting and were offered $463,000 in scholarships.

As a way to say thank you to the teens, MSI surprised the group of seniors, will be going off to college in the fall, with laptop computers provided by CDW Corporation.

“Our Science Achievers are a shining example of the many ways MSI inspires and motivates our children to achieve their full potential in science, technology, medicine, and engineering,” said David Mosena, Museum president and CEO, in a written statement.

The Science Achievers program is a part of the MSI’s Center for the Advancement of Science Education (CASE).

t.hill@hpherald.com